Katie Marie Muschlewski teaches Kundalini Yoga to all ages and abilities in the Madison, Wisconsin area. 


She founded Lotus Roots Kundalini Yoga in 2005 and launched her Yoga Sprouts! Child & Caregiver Yoga Adventures in 2007, and published her first book in 2013.


As a mother, she finds yoga to be an important part of her family's life.  Teaching our children relaxation and stress-relief techniques will give them tools to help them throughout their lives.  


For more information, please visit Lotus Roots Kundalini Yoga

This website is dedicated to celebrate the joy and benefits of yoga for young people.  Please visit the Photo Gallery to see pictures of blissful children and adults from various classes over the years.  

Teaching our youth is a great joy to me, and I honor and respect everyone who has attended a Yoga Sprouts class in the past, present, and future! For more information please email or visit Lotus Roots Kundalini Yoga. Thank you!

We do what we do like no one else does

Let your True Self Blossom!

Child & Caregiver Yoga Adventures


Yoga Guidelines

Yoga Sprouts! Child & Caregiver Yoga Adventures promote health and wellness in children of all ages and abilities.  These classes are designed to share the fun and benefits of yoga with the entire family and especially our youngest members.  Yoga Sprouts engenders a positive mindset and promotes healthy choices.  Welcome and Enjoy!

What to expect:

        Class is relaxed and children are encouraged to listen to their breath as they move their bodies.  Everyone is different and each day is different so a little chaos on some days is expected!  The best way to encourage your child to participate in class is to embody a positive attitude and to participate to your best ability as well.  Some children may be shy at the first class and will warm up as class progresses.  The atmosphere is relaxed and friendly, we encourage parents to soothe their children as needed.  Nursing babies are always welcome.

Please follow these simple guidelines before you begin your yoga practice.

Preparation:

When you are ready to begin, spread out your yoga mat in a clean, spacious area.  Please wear comfortable clothing in which you can move easily.  It is best to do yoga on a relatively empty stomach and barefoot.  We tune-in to our body’s rhythm by listening to the breath.  We sing the letter “O” three times to create a body memory to begin our practice and help keep focus.  We also sing our Yoga Sprouts Namo Song to promote community and to get a little loud before we quiet down.  We then follow a sequence of exercises in order, and all may feel free to relax in between poses.

Length of Posture:

Beginner's will vary their length of postures.  Some poses are more advanced and will be done for shorter periods of time; also modifications will be explained.  Some postures require assistance or a partner.  This is a good opportunity to connect with your child or to let your child explore new friendships with other children in class.  Try to always breathe through the nose unless otherwise instructed.  Try to relax the muscles as you stretch for five or more counts. Movement exercises may be done for 1 – 3 minutes, but you are always welcome to shorten the time, starting with 30 seconds and adding 30 seconds more when ready.

Relax Between Poses:

It is always fine to take a short 30 seconds to 1 minute rest in between the exercises.  Either sit in Flower Pose or lie on your back.  Close your eyes and listen to your breath during these short periods of rest.  When you are ready to continue, take a deep breath then exhale as you slowly open your eyes or Rock n’ Roll to sit back up.

Conclusion:

To end a set, we lay down and rest for 4 or more minutes.  Lay on your back with your arms at your sides, palms up.  We may listen to soothing music or cover up with a blanket.  Our sets call this Worm Pose or Mummy Pose and it is important to relax and let go for a few moments at the end of each set.  Some may doze a little during this rest time.  When we are ready to finish, we wiggle the fingers and toes, stretch, and come back to a seated position.  We close our sets by singing the “ahhhh” sound of the letter A, three times.  Again this creates a body memory to conclude the yoga set.  When you finish your yoga practice, it is good to drink a big glass of water.  Smile and thank your body for working so hard!

Names:

You may recognize some yoga poses and notice it has a different name.  For instance Horse Ride is the same as Camel Ride and Downward Dog is the same as Pyramid Pose.  Feel free to draw these parallels to your child's attention when you notice them.  Repetition helps us remember the postures both physically and mentally.

Positive Mindset:

It is important to keep your practice light-hearted and fun.  Always try to embody a positive attitude when you practice yoga.  Caregivers and children should try not to push themselves too hard too fast or worry if they are using a modification to the exercise.  We can only do our best and our best will change at any moment.  Our feelings and emotions are important and deserve attention.  How we act on our feelings is what determines our character.  We should notice when we feel upset and we should explore the origin of that feeling.  However, we should try to think nice things about ourselves and say nice things to those practicing with us during yoga practice.  Remember it is yoga practice not yoga perfect!


Katie Muschlewski

Sharing the gift of yoga with your kids brings families closer together while connecting with your inner self.


Yoga has so many benefits on our internal systems.  We can balance our metabolism, stimulate the nervous system, expand the respiratory system, and so much more!  Yoga is calming, and it helps us tune inward to explore who we really are.  For this reason our mantra in Kundalini Yoga is Sat Nam or True Name.  Yoga Sprouts hopes to inspire you to share yoga with the children in your life.